Other Bouvier Clubs



 

 

 

 

 

 

Online Bouvier des Flandres Clubs
American Bouvier des Flandres Club

US Regional Clubs
Southern California BdF Club
Cascade (Oregon) BdF Club
Bouvier des Flandres Club of Southeastern Michigan

Canada Clubs
Bouvier des Flandres Club of Canada

International Bouvier Clubs
Deutscher Bouvier Club
British Bouvier Association

Clubs with unknown web presence
Bouvier Club of Northern California
Alberta (Canada) BdF Club
Club De Bouvier Des Flandres Du Québec
Finland BdF Club

Bouvier des Flandres

THE BOUVIER des FLANDRES

The Bouvier des Flandres is a powerfully built, compact, short-coupled, rough-coated dog of notably rugged appearance. He gives the impression of great strength without any sign of heaviness or clumsiness in his overall makeup. He is agile, spirited and bold, yet his serene, well-behaved disposition denotes his steady, resolute and fearless character. His gaze is alert and brilliant, depicting his intelligence, vigor and daring. By nature he is an equable dog.

His origin is that of a cattle herder and general farmer’s helper, including cart pulling. He is an ideal farm dog. His harsh coat protects him in all weather, enabling him to perform the most arduous tasks.  He has been used as an ambulance and messenger dog. Modern times find his as a watch and guard dog as well as a family friend, guardian and protector. His physical and mental characteristics and deportment, coupled with his olfactory abilities, his intelligence and initiative enable him to also perform as a tracking dog.

A FRIEND FOR LIFE

The Bouvier des Flandres is a regal dog with both the power and determination to win your heart and become a loyal companion for life. Bouviers establish themselves as significant members of the family and give their all to please and protect the home and the occupants.

Bouviers are intelligent and learn quickly when given the opportunity to gain positive reinforcement throughout the learning process. This breed works well in obedience, agility, herding, tracking and conformation.

Bouvier des Flandres is a great family dog and can be very helpful to have them as your watch dog or guard dog. They might be quite inactive indoors and prefer most of the time being outdoors.

They are given the French name due to their Flemish origin. They originate from Belgium and have a life span of about 10 to 12 years. On an average female Bouvier des Flandres litter about 8 puppies. Their body is fully covered with fur and rough coat and requires continuous grooming. They have to be bathed frequently and trimmed several times in a year. They can be good friends with other dogs as well as long as they are socialized at a very young age. Though they can be good friends with your child, but might not be very friendly with your child’s friends. Therefore, it is advised not to leave them with your children.

Bouviers are the best pets and they also require good care. Regular visit to the veterinary doctor and the vaccinations are required. To overcome these expenses you have the option of investing in a life time pet insurance cover or set aside a certain amount every month to meet the expenses.
 

Reading List Favourites

Amazon Books:

– 4-M Dog Books
– Dogwise Dog Books
– Barnes and Noble Books

Bouvier des Flandres Books:

– Bouvier des Flandres: The Dogs of Flandres by James Engel.
– The Bouvier des Flandres by Claire D. McLean.

Puppy and Basic Training Books:

– The Art of Raising A Puppy by New Skete Monks
– Mother Knows Best: The Natural Way to Train Your Dog by Carol Lea Benjamin
– How to Be Your Dog’s Best Friend : A Training Manual for Dog Owners by New Skete Monks
– Surviving Your Dog’s Adolescence: A Positive Training Program by Carol Lea Benjamin
– Second Hand Dog: How to Turn Yours into a First-Rate Pet by Carol Lea Benjamin
– Fun and Games with Dogs: Educational and Fun Games to Teach Your Dog to Enjoy Working With You by Roy Hunter, Judi – Duffy
– MORE Fun and Games with Dogs by Roy Hunter, Judi Duffy
– Dog Training for Kids by Carol Lea Benjamin

Clicker (Animal Modification) Books:

– Don’t Shoot the Dog! The New Art of Teaching and Training by Karen Pryor
– Clicker Fun: Dog Tricks and Games Using Positive Reinforcement by Deborah Jones, Susan L. Coons (Illustrator)

Dog Showing and Training Books:

– Born to Win, Breed to Succeed by Patricia Craige
– Dog Eat Dog: A Very Human Book About Dogs and Dog Shows by Jane Stern, Michael Stern
– Dog Showing: An Owner’s Guide by Connie Vanacore
– Dog Showing for Beginners by Lynn Hall
– The Great American Dog Show Game by Alvin Grossman, R. Annabel Rathman (Editor), William W. Denlinger (Editor)
– The Joy of Breeding Your Own Show Dog by Margaret Ruth Smith, Ann Seranne, Julia Gasow (Designer)
– Show Me!: A Dog Showing Primer by D. Caroline Coile
– Junior Handling: The Complete Guide on How to Show Your Dog by Felix Cosme
– K-9 Structure and Terminology by Edward M. Gilbert, Jr. and Thelma R. Brown
– The New Dogsteps by Rachel Page Elliot
– The Winning Edge: Show Ring Secrets by George G. Alston, Connie Vanacore

Competition Obedience Books:

– Beyond Basic Dog Training by Diane L. Bauman
– Competitive Obedience for Winners by Brian McGovern
– Clicker Training for Obedience: Shaping Top Performance – Positively by Morgan Spector, Foreword by Karen Pryor
– What All Good Dogs Should Know, The Sensible Way to Train by Jack Volhard and Melissa Bartlett

Bouvier Breed Standard

AKC Breed Standard for the Bouvier des Flandres

General Appearance

The Bouvier des Flandres is a powerfully built, compact, short-coupled, rough-coated dog of notably rugged appearance. He gives the impression of great strength without any sign of heaviness or clumsiness in his overall makeup. He is agile, spirited and bold, yet his serene, well behaved disposition denotes his steady, resolute and fearless character. His gaze is alert and brilliant, depicting his intelligence, vigor and daring. By nature he is an equable dog. His origin is that of a cattle herder and general farmer’s helper, including cart pulling. He is an ideal farm dog. His harsh double coat protects him in all weather, enabling him to perform the most arduous tasks. He has been used as an ambulance and messenger dog. Modern times find him as a watch and guard dog as well as a family friend, guardian and protector. His physical and mental characteristics and deportment, coupled with his olfactory abilities, his intelligence and initiative enable him to also perform as a tracking dog and a guide dog for the blind. The following description is that of the ideal Bouvier des Flandres. Any deviation from this is to be penalized to the extent of the deviation.

Size, Proportion & Substance

Size
The height as measured at the withers: Dogs, from 24 1/2 to 27 1/2 inches; bitches, from 23 1/2 to 26 1/2 inches. In each sex, the ideal height is the median of the two limits, i.e., 26 inches for a dog and 25 inches for a bitch. Any dog or bitch deviating from the minimum or maximum limits mentioned shall be severely penalized.
Proportion
The length from the point of the shoulder to the tip of the buttocks is equal to the height from the ground to the highest point of the withers. A long-bodied dog should be seriously faulted.
Substance
Powerfully built, strong boned, well muscled, without any sign of heaviness or clumsiness.

Head

The head is impressive in scale, accentuated by beard and mustache. It is in proportion to body and build. The expression is bold and alert.
Eyes neither protrude nor are sunken in the sockets. Their shape is oval with the axis on the horizontal plane, when viewed from the front. Their color is a dark brown. The eye rims are black without lack of pigment and the haw is barely visible. Yellow or light eyes are to be strongly penalized, along with a walleyed or staring expression.
Ears placed high and alert. If cropped, they are to be a triangular contour and in proportion to the size of the head. The inner corner of the ear should be in line with the outer corner of the eye. Ears that are too low or too closely set are serious faults.
Skull well developed and flat, slightly less wide than long. When viewed from the side, the top lines of the skull and the muzzle are parallel. It is wide between the ears, with the frontal groove barely marked. The stop is more apparent than real, due to upstanding eyebrows. The proportions of length of skull to length of muzzle are 3 to 2.
Muzzle broad, strong, well filled out, tapering gradually toward the nose without ever becoming snipy or pointed. A narrow, snipy muzzle is faulty.
Nose large, black, well developed, round at the edges, with flared nostrils. A brown, pink or spotted nose is a serious fault. The cheeks are flat and lean, with the lips being dry and tight fitting. The jaws are powerful and of equal length. The teeth are strong, white and healthy, with the incisors meeting in a scissors bite. Overshot or undershot bites are to be severely penalized.

Neck, Topline, & Body

The neck is strong and muscular, widening gradually into the shoulders. When viewed from the side, it is gracefully arched with proud carriage. A short, squatty neck is faulty. No dewlap.
Back short, broad, well muscled with firm level topline. It is supple and flexible with no sign of weakness.
Body or trunk powerful, broad and short. The chest is broad, with the brisket extending to the elbow in depth. The ribs are deep and well sprung. The first ribs are slightly curved, the others well sprung and very well sloped nearing the rear, giving proper depth to the chest. Flat ribs or slab sidedness is to be strongly penalized.
Flanks and loins short, wide and well muscled, without weakness. The abdomen is only slightly tucked up. The horizontal line of the back should mold unnoticeably into the curve of the rump, which is characteristically wide. A sunken or slanted croup is a serious fault.
Tail is to be docked, leaving 2 or 3 vertebrae. It must be set high and align normally with the spinal column. Preferably carried upright in motion. Dogs born tailless should not be penalized.

Forequarters

Strong boned, well muscled and straight. The shoulders are relatively long, muscular but not loaded, with good layback. The shoulder blade and humerus are approximately the same length, forming an angle slightly greater than 90 degrees when standing. Steep shoulders are faulty.
Elbows close to the body and parallel. Elbows which are too far out or in are faults.
Forearms viewed either in profile or from the front are perfectly straight, parallel to each other and perpendicular to the ground. They are well muscled and strong boned.
Carpus exactly in line with the forearms. Strong boned.
Pasterns quite short, slightly sloped. Dewclaws may be removed. Both forefeet and hind feet are rounded and compact turning neither in nor out; the toes close and well arched; strong black nails; thick tough pads.

Hindquarters

Firm, well muscled with large, powerful hams. They should be parallel with the front legs when viewed from either front or rear.
Legs moderately long, well muscled, neither too straight nor too inclined.
Thighs wide and muscular. The upper thigh must be neither too straight nor too sloping. There is moderate angulation at the stifle.
Hocks strong, rather close to the ground. When standing and seen from the rear, they will be straight and perfectly parallel to each other. In motion, they must turn neither in nor out. There is a slight angulation at the hock joint. Sickle or cow-hocks are serious faults.
Metatarsi hardy and lean, rather cylindrical and perpendicular to the ground when standing. If born with dewclaws, they are to be removed.
Feet as in front.

Coat

A tousled, double coat capable of withstanding the hardest work in the most inclement weather. The outer hairs are rough and harsh, with the undercoat being fine, soft and dense. The coat may be trimmed slightly only to accent the body line. Over trimming which alters the natural rugged appearance is to be avoided.
Topcoat must be harsh to the touch, dry, trimmed, if necessary, to a length of approximately 21Ú2 inches. A coat too long or too short is a fault, as is a silky or woolly coat. It is tousled without being curly. On the skull, it is short, and on the upper part of the back, it is particularly close and harsh always, however, remaining rough. Ears are rough-coated.
Undercoat a dense mass of fine, close hair, thicker in winter. Together with the topcoat, it will form a water-resistant covering. A flat coat, denoting lack of undercoat is a serious fault.
Mustache and beard very thick, with the hair being shorter and rougher on the upper side of the muzzle. The upper lip with its heavy mustache and the chin with its heavy and rough beard gives that gruff expression so characteristic of the breed.
Eyebrows, erect hairs accentuating the shape of the eyes without ever veiling them.

Color

From fawn to black, passing through salt and pepper, gray and brindle. A small white star on the chest is allowed. Other than chocolate brown, white, or parti-color, which are to be severely penalized, no one color is to be favored.

Gait

The whole of the Bouvier des Flandres must be harmoniously proportioned to allow for a free, bold and proud gait. The reach of the forequarters must compensate for and be in balance with the driving power of the hindquarters. The back, while moving in a trot, will remain firm and flat. In general, the gait is the logical demonstration of the structure and build of the dog. It is to be noted that while moving at a fast trot, the properly built Bouvier will tend to single-track.

Temperament

The Bouvier is an equable dog, steady, resolute and fearless. Viciousness or shyness is undesirable.
Effective February 23, 2000

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Congratulations, you have discovered a new dog for your loved ones. Having a dog is a amazing way to enhance your kid’s progression and make amazing reminiscences to be valued for decades to come. Keep in mind, though – your function is not done. Actually, it will never be. Exercising your dog and your kids together is a life-long venture. Accountable dog possession goes hand-in-hand with responsible nurturing. Appreciate, and enjoy!”

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